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Cities, Towns, and the County

Cities, Towns, and the County

While our sustainability challenges are global in scale, local governments, with the support of residents, businesses and nonprofit organizations, play a key role in tackling these issues and in carrying out laws made at the federal and state levels. The actions of local governments impact everything from land use patterns and resource management to climate change and the delivery of social services.

Each year, SSMC surveys the cities, towns, and unincorporated San Mateo County to find out what they are doing to create a more sustainable region. This year the questions focused on our Key Indicator: The Cost of Living and sustainability goals.

Use the following links to jump to the sustainability goals by city:

Atherton • Belmont • Brisbane • Burlingame • Colma • Daly City • East Palo Alto • Foster City • Half Moon Bay • Hillsborough • Menlo Park • Millbrae • Pacifica • Portola Valley • Redwood City • San Bruno • San Carlos • San Mateo • South San Francisco • Woodside • San Mateo County

Parking, Housing, Development Survey

Commute time & distance is often impacted by the cost and availability of housing. We asked each city how many of their municipal staff, firefighters and police officers live outside the county or more than 20 miles from their municipality. We also asked policies that have been enacted to ease the transportation and/or housing costs for employees.

City Survey Chart
NOTE: In 2015 the City of South San Francisco surveyed employees and found that 82% live outside the city, 51% live outside the county, and 38% live more than 20 miles from South San Francisco’s City Hall.
Survey Tabulation

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Atherton

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Energy and water, transportation and land use, solid waste and importantly the education and promotion of these topics to the community. Please see the Town’s adopted Climate Action Plan: http://www.ci.atherton.ca.us/index.aspx?nid=454 Other sustainable programs / projects implemented

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

Hosted a 2017 Earth Day event: http://www.ci.atherton.ca.us/index.aspx?nid=463

Survey – Atherton

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Belmont

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • The City of Belmont has been actively engaged in completing energy retrofit projects at City facilities such as City Hall and the Belmont Library, as well as improvements to infrastructure such as LED street lights. The City would like to continue these efforts to make our facilities and operations as sustainable as possible.
  • On the other hand, the City has taken small actions to better equip Belmont Residents with opportunities to make improvements to their personal property that help reduce energy/water consumption, or utilize renewable energy sources. In 2016 we authorized several PACE financing providers that help residents make improvements to their property. We have reduced or waived permit fees for solar panel and electric vehicle charger installations. We would like to continue to make it easy and affordable for resident of Belmont to engage in activities or make improvements to their personal property that make Belmont a healthier community.

Survey – Belmont

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Brisbane

Does your city have a minimum wage ordinance? Please describe the timeline, wage levels and other adjustments (such as requirements for use of prevailing wage labor in city-owned developments.)

Will be considered by the City Council.

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Reduction of overall greenhouse gas emissions to meet Climate Action Plan goals

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

City Council funded the Parkside at Brisbane Village Precise Plan to envision affordable and workforce downtown mixed-use development consisting of housing and retail. The plan allowed for significant community input at an early stage.

Survey – Brisbane

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Burlingame

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Build affordable housing
  • Transition to future net zero green building standards
  • Achieve zero waste
  • Support the EV network
  • Expand solar energy and opt-ups to Peninsula Clean Energy’s ECO100
  • Reduce transportation emissions

Survey – Burlingame

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Colma

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • The Town is fortunate to have made great strides in lowering energy use on a municipal level and by private property owners and businesses. The Town was the only recipient in the state to receive a Gold Beacon Award last year for our reductions and sustainability practices. The Town is currently working with our waste franchise of Republic Services on implementing residential and commercial green waste and recycling to reduce the number of items entering the waste stream.
  • We have largely addressed all of our short-term goals. Our long-term goals are to continue to connect businesses with energy saving programs and improvements, including the desire to have more businesses add solar systems to their facilities. The Town will continue to look for ways to improve sustainability at municipal facilities. The Town has monthly sustainability meetings that include representatives from all Town departments.
  • The Town is currently working with our cemeteries and the SMCO Resource Conservation District on strategies for water reduction and efficiency. Many of our larger cemeteries have received audits that provide a roadmap of improvements to irrigation facilities.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • We’ve had significant success in increasing recycling and organics collection at our Colma businesses since the rollout of the new franchise agreement. For example, Lucky Chances has been a champion of the new organics recycling program and not only started the new organics recycling program they also have internal collections bins throughout their kitchen, restaurant and game room, and have fully participated in the staff training for the new programs.
  • We have submitted Colma’s AB 939 (recycling mandate) reporting requirements, due August 1, 2017, to the State’s CalRecycle enforcement agency and have met and exceeded AB 939 recycling requirements.
  • The City Council will consider a resolution on September 13, 2017 stating the Town’s continued support for the Paris Agreement and our Town’s ongoing commitment to implement greenhouse gas reduction programs that include energy efficiency, water conservation and expanded recycling /organics collection.

Survey – Colma

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Daly City

Does your city have a minimum wage ordinance? Please describe the timeline, wage levels and other adjustments (such as requirements for use of prevailing wage labor in city-owned developments.)

Will be considered by the City Council.

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Increasing diversion of organics and recyclables from the landfill: Under our new contract with the garbage company, Daly City began offering curbside pickup of organics in February 2016. This new program is gradually helping to increase our diversion, but behavior change is a major challenge in getting residents to separate organics.
  • Reducing illegal dumping and litter: Illegal dumping is a major challenge in Daly City and is strongly correlated with lower household incomes, lower education attainment, etc. Littering is also rampant. There are clearly health and safety concerns as well as stormwater management concerns.
  • Better stormwater management in a concrete jungle through green infrastructure: Daly City is completely built out. Many residents have paved their front yards to make room for more parking spaces in this overcrowded city. The amount of impervious surface is increasing.
  • Increasing urban canopy cover/growing and diversifying our urban forest: Tree death rates have increased following the recent drought, due to water stress and disease. Since only three species account for the majority of trees planted in Daly City, our urban forest is not very resilient to external shocks like drought. Even before the drought, urban canopy cover was low. Increasing tree planting in a city filled with impervious surfaces is difficult and expensive, especially when concrete must be removed for tree wells.
  • Further reducing greenhouse gas emissions (luckily we have Peninsula Clean Energy now!) and increasing energy efficiency: Financing and installing EV charging stations is a challenge for Daly City due to fiscal constraints, increasing the amount of energy upgrades in housing is a challenge due to cost and education barriers, etc.
  • Climate change adaptation: How will we adapt our communities to deal with increasingly intense rainfall events and extended drought?
  • Sea level rise impacts to coastal bluffs and closed coastal Mussel Rock Landfill: Erosion of coastal bluffs is a concern for single-family homes located along the coast. Daly City has experienced landslides in the past that resulted in homes being abandoned and demolished. The closed landfill has also been studied as part of the County’s sea level rise vulnerability assessment, since it is already subject to erosion from waves. The City is currently planning for necessary improvements that include raising the height of a sea wall. But in the long term, these improvements will not be enough. Will we have to physically move the contents of the landfill to an inland location, what will the cost be for that?
  • Water conservation as drought will inevitably dominate our climate – Daly City has the lowest per capita water consumption in the County already, but we will still be impacted by future water restrictions.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • Project Green Space is a tree planting and rain garden program aimed at increasing our community’s resilience to climate change and better managing stormwater. Daly City is one of the most densely populated cities in the country and experiences some of the highest pollution burdens in the County of San Mateo. Our highly urbanized population, with lower median household incomes than the rest of the region, now faces a new climate reality in an overwhelmingly concrete jungle. The urban forest is dominated by three tree species, two of which have been steadily declining from drought stress and disease. The decimated urban forest simply cannot counter the impacts of pollution and climate change, leaving the City’s predominantly lower-income population completely exposed.
  • Project Green Space began in 2016 with a $25,000 grant from Cities of Service and the Walmart Foundation. Over the course of one year, community volunteers planted 90 drought-tolerant trees and a series of 10 drought-tolerant rain gardens. All trees have been adopted by community members. Using an impact volunteering model, community members have become champions for new green infrastructure in their neighborhoods. The approach has treated rain gardens as community gardens and street trees as community trees. These installations are transformed into green community assets, not just stormwater infrastructure created by the City.
  • The City just received a second $25,000 grant from Cities of Service and the Walmart Foundation to build upon this success in two disadvantaged neighborhoods that suffer from the highest pollution burdens, mostly from high volume traffic on major highways that bisect the City. With the help of two AmeriCorps VISTAs and strong partnerships with community groups, work is underway to install new green spaces in the areas of the city that need it the most. Daly City residents are demonstrating that resilience is built from within communities and are setting the example that all people can actively adapt to the new climate reality by working together.

Survey – Daly City

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Foster City

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Continue water conservation expand alternative energy resources and alternative transportation options available to community.
  • Levee Protection Planning and Improvements Project

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

We are currently working on a 2-year Sustainable Foster City Plan incorporating Economic Development, Environmental Sustainability and Social Engagement.

Survey – Foster City

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Half Moon Bay

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

The City has been working on comprehensive updates to its Local Coastal Program and General Plan. Following these efforts, it will be time to prepare a Climate Action Plan (CAP). HMB has very small staff and support for the CAP and other sustainability work to implement the new land use policies would be very helpful.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment, completed April 2016; followed by detailed coastal erosion analysis of portion of the California Coastal Trail
  • The City was one of very few that participated in the Shrinking Shores demonstration project on World Oceans day. For this event, at Poplar Beach in Half Moon Bay, the City partnered with the San Mateo County Department of Sustainability (photos below)
  • Local Coastal Land Use Plan and General Plan updates on-going
  • City Council prioritization of affordable housing, including application for the “Home For All” pilot project grant, establishment of a new staff position to support affordable housing programs (recruitment underway)
  • Parks Master Plan underway, anticipated completion winter 2018
  • Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan underway, anticipated completion spring 2018

Survey – Half Moon Bay

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Hillsborough

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Since Hillsborough does not have a major public transportation connection within its boundaries and both El Camino Real and Highway 280 run through/adjacent to it, there is a skewed greenhouse gas emission count credited towards the Town, and public transportation opportunities are a challenge. However, we continue to actively participate in C/CAG and advocate for programs such as Scoot.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • Community Garden
  • Earth Day as noted above.
  • Scoot
  • Annual Earth Day event, which includes shredding, composting, energy efficiency and other sustainable opportunities and programs.
  • Founding member of Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE)

Survey – Hillsborough

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Menlo Park

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Short-term: Keeping pace with EV charging station demandTransitioning away from a away from a natural gas infrastructureTraffic congestion and affordable housingMake progress on the Climate Action Plan (CAP) update and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions inventoryZero Waste Plan

Long-term: Implementation of Zero Waste Plan and rate studyContinued implementation of Climate Action Plan

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

On December 6, 2016, the City Council adopted three new zoning districts (Connect Menlo). The new districts set the framework for creating the live/work/play environment concept that was desired for the area. Each of the districts includes development regulations, design standards, transportation demand management, and green and sustainable building requirements.

Between El Camino Real and the Caltrain right-of-way (Station 1300 El Camino Real), 11 parcels of land will be transformed into a mixed-use development. These parcels generally consist of vacant, previously developed land. A total of 184 housing units, with 20 of them being Below Market Rate housing, will be included in this space. This project exemplifies smart growth by developing attractive affordable housing adjacent to major transit centers.

In November, the City debuted a Frequent Rider Card program, offering prizes for people who shop locally by bike. Participants received a free “Frequent Rider Card” helping them explore local stores and win prizes when they shopped by bike. Riders could visit seven participating stores by bicycle and make a purchase between November and New Year’s Eve.

A hallmark initiative for the City was the creation of its Community Zero Waste Plan. The plan was created through the collaboration of City staff and various consulting groups. Together, these parties form the zero waste plan project team. Many strategies outlined in the plan have a nexus with the City’s Climate Action Plan.

In addition to the milestones and accomplishments shown below The City’s Environmental Quality Commission meets monthly to discuss a variety of sustainability topics, and the City’s Sustainability Division provides leadership in completing relevant sustainability projects, along with other compliance and regulatory duties. A number of Menlo Park non-profit organizations support these efforts as well.

The City provides residents and businesses with information, tools, and resources to be more sustainable. Examples include quarterly water and garbage bill inserts to make residents aware of sustainability programs and events, solid waste and recycling stickers for our customers so they know what solid waste materials go into which cart/bin, free water-efficient fixture giveaways for our residents, FAQ material on the City’s website, and presentational slides that are displayed throughout the City facilities on flat screen TV’s. The City has a Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram account that it uses to promote sustainable activities. The City has tabled Sustainability Division information during Facebook Farmers Markets, Earth Day events, and Coastal Cleanup Day events.

Sustainability milestones and accomplishments:

2005 – Menlo Park completes baseline GHG inventory

2009 – City adopts CAP

2012 – City adopts polystyrene food ware ordinance

2013 – City adopts 27% GHG reduction target

2013 – City adopts reusable bag ordinance

2014 – Implementation of Environmental Purchasing Policy

2015 – Variable frequency drive systems installed in Burgess Pool and Belle Haven Pool

2015 – New chillers and variable frequency drive system installed at City Hall/Administration Building and Library

2015 – New energy monitoring system installed at City Hall/Administration building and Library

2015 – Solar photovoltaic installations completed at the Arrillaga Family Gymnastics Center, Civic Center parking lot (solar carport), Arrillaga Family Gymnasium, Onetta Harris Community Center, and City Corporation Yard

2015 – City teamed up with Menlo Spark, Facebook, and the nonprofit, GRID Alternatives to provide free solar panels to 10 residences in Belle Haven

2016 – City Council approves of Caltrain Go Pass for city staff

2016 – Electric vehicle charger installations for Civic Center and downtown Parking Plaza 2

2016 – Menlo Park named as 2016 Business Environmental Award Finalist

2016 – City receives a Silicon Valley Water Conservation Award

2017 – City host’s 1st annual Earth Day Celebration event

2017 – Participates in a Community Choice Energy program called Peninsula Clean Energy

2017 – All municipal operations are powered using ECO100 (100% carbon-free renewable electricity)

2017 – New zoning ordinances include green sustainable building requirements

2017 – Zero Waste Plan

Survey – Menlo Park

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Millbrae

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Lack of affordable housing, storm water flooding, sea level rise, traffic congestion, increase and diversify the business and employment opportunities for Millbrae.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • Participated in the 2016-17 San Mateo County Sea Level Rise Assessment Project.
  • Participate in the Grand Boulevard Initiative to improve streetscapes for pedestrian and bicycle travel.
  • General Plan Update 2040 in progress. Includes sustainability measures, Active transportation plan and Millbrae Priority Development Area Specific Plan.
  • Project development- Millbrae Station Area Specific Plan
  • City of Millbrae Water Resources and Conservations Program
  • Coastal Cleanup Day
  • City of Millbrae Recycling and Waste Prevention Program
  • Rainwater Harvesting Information and Rebate Program
  • Single-Use Carryout Bag Ordinance
  • Sustainable Food Service Ware Ordinance and Information
  • AB 34 1 Mandatory Commercial Recycling
  • AB1826 Mandatory Commercial Food Scrap Collection
  • Energy Upgrade California – San Mateo County
  • New Free Sprinkler Nozzle Head Program
  • Water Use Regulations
  • Water Pollution Prevention Program
  • Energy Conservation Programs
  • Community Choice Energy – Peninsula Clean Energy Program
  • Climate Protection
  • California Solar Initiative Program
  • Bay Area Certified Green Business
  • Workshops: Water Wise Landscaping, Composting, Sustainable Gardening and Landscape Design.
  • Spare the Air Information

Survey – Millbrae

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Pacifica

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Greenhouse gas emissions reduction measures and adaptation measures from climate change.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

The City is placing a rent stabilization measure on the 2017 election ballot. The City is working on monitoring and implementing the locally adopted Climate Action Plan.

Survey – Pacifica

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Portola Valley

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Currently reviewing use of rodenticides on its playing fields and herbicides on its trails.
  • Continue to address the impact of the recent drought on trees, including Sudden Oak Death as well as explore approaches to reduce energy use in existing building stock, including plug-load management and fuel-switching programs.
  • Expect to continue to address issues with drought and groundwater management.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

100% Renewable Electricity: The Town Council voted to enroll all of the electricity accounts in Portola Valley into Peninsula Clean Energy’s ECO 100, 100% renewable energy portfolio. Portola Valley was one of the first municipalities in the Country to enter a Community Choice Energy program at 100% renewable energy.

Enhanced Construction & Demolition Ordinance: The Planning, Building and Public Works Department worked together to update the Town’s C&D Ordinance, increasing the required diversion rate to 75% and applying it to all projects. In addition, the Town utilized the Green Halo waste management platform to ease record keeping for the contractors, increase compliance and extract statistics.

Updated Green Building Ordinance: The Town Council approved an update to the Town’s Green Building Ordinance with the addition of several innovative measures including a greywater readiness requirement, rainwater capture with the use of any turf in the landscape and increased EV and solar readiness. The California Energy Commission approved the updated Ordinance on July 15, 2017. The update to the Green Building Ordinance helps put residential construction in Portola Valley on a path to meet the California Public Utilities Commission Zero Net Energy Goal for 2020.

Survey – Portola Valley

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Redwood City

Does your city have a minimum wage ordinance? Please describe the timeline, wage levels and other adjustments (such as requirements for use of prevailing wage labor in city-owned developments.)

Will be considered by the City Council.

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Short-term issues include addressing housing affordability, adopting and implementing Zero Net Energy codes and ordinances, and implementing effective programs for reducing transportation emissions.
  • Long-term issues include water conservation, energy efficiency, and fuel switching programs; local food system, food waste, and waste reduction; and Sea-Level Rise, Climate Resilience, and Adaptation planning.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

Housing: Since 2011, the City of Redwood City has eased certain restrictions in the Downtown area to help promote residential development and add to the City’s housing stock. More recently, the City passed two substantive ordinances that seek to help encourage the development of affordable housing units and add to the housing stock.

The City Council amended the Municipal Code relating to Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) allowing for more flexibility in the existing ordinance in order to encourage the development of more housing units in the City. The Council also passed the Ordinance Requiring Affordable Housing Impact Fees that either encourage developers to build affordable housing in their housing developments or collects fees towards the creation of new homes for lower income residents. In 2016, the City approved the first projects with the new Affordable Housing Fee, raising $2 million to date for affordable housing. There are currently 200+ affordable housing units under consideration.

Peninsula Clean Energy: The City moved forward in 2016 with Peninsula Clean Energy, a countywide Community Choice Energy program designed to reduce the carbon content of our electricity supply. In addition, municipal electricity accounts were opted up to PCE’s ECO100 program in October 2016 and are now supplied by 100% renewable energy.      

Water Conservation and Recycled Water Program: Redwood City’s comprehensive water conservation program provides information, education, and updates to residents and the public, with online information about Programs & Giveaways, Education, Helpful Links & Tips, Drought Updates, and a list of the City’s Efforts to Conserve Water. In 2016, these programs, combined with expansion of the City’s recycled water project, resulted in the City conserving 670 million gallons of water communitywide.

Survey – Redwood City

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San Bruno

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Traffic: Parking, Roadway Congestion, Creating opportunities for active transportation

Green Infrastructure: Green streets, completing a GI Plan

Mandatory Commercial/Organic Recycling: Outreaching to businesses and MFDs to educate them on new CalRecycle requirements.

Survey – San Bruno

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San Carlos

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Transportation is the most pressing short and long-term sustainability-related issue for the City of San Carlos. Transportation emissions are impacted by housing availability and longer commutes, limited public transportation and challenges with improving pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. While the City of San Carlos has worked to reduce transportation emissions in town, many of the sustainability initiatives in this sector would benefit from a regional approach.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • The City approved three PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) financing programs for San Carlos: the California HERO program, the Open PACE Program and the CaliforniaFIRST Financing Program. The HERO and Open PACE programs were both introduced to San Carlos in 2015. There have been a number of projects undertaken by property owners using these programs.
  • In Summer 2016, three electric vehicle-charging stations – two DC Fast Charging Stations and one Level 2 Charging Station – were installed in the Library garage at no cost to the City.
  • On July 13, 2015, the City participated in PG&E’s Sustainable Solutions Turnkey Program, which helps agencies manage and fund energy efficiency and renewable generation projects. The Facilities Energy Conservation Improvements Project began in early 2016 and provided mechanical and lighting retrofits for City Hall, Library, Adult Community Center, Corporation Yard, Laureola Building, Youth Center, Kiwanis Building and Fire Stations #13 and #16. The lighting retrofits were completed in June 2016. The mechanical retrofits are ongoing and are expected to be completed in 2017.
  • The City of San Carlos continues to promote the Bay Area Regional Energy Network (BayREN) program through its website, brochures and workshops. In 2016, 11 projects were completed through the Home Upgrade and Advanced Upgrade program.
  • In August 2016, SamTrans started a new bus service (Route 61) in San Carlos to help students get to and from school. The new route serves Tierra Linda, Charter Learning Center and Carlmont and has been very successful so far, and the traffic congestion near the schools has been positively impacted.
  • As a result of Measure A grant funding form the San Mateo County Transportation Authority, a new and free commuter shuttle serving San Carlos businesses was launched in September 2016. The shuttle runs from the San Carlos Caltrain station to various stops along the northeast side of San Carlos during commute hours to serve several businesses.
  • In January 2016, the City of San Carlos added 11 decorative bike racks to Laurel Street to encourage bicycle transportation.
  • Throughout 2015/16, City Maintenance crews replaced passive grass areas throughout the City with infill mix or decomposed granite. In total, over 60,000 square feet of lawn and vegetation were replaced with picnic areas, pathways and planter areas with drought-tolerant plants, resulting in a significant reduction in water use.
  • Transit Center. Prometheus (through a public-private partnership with SamTrans) is developing a 4.26 acre site adjacent to the San Carlos Caltrain Station. The Transit Center includes a dedicated area for busses, shuttles, taxis, a passenger drop-off area, and bus layover parking; 261 commuter parking spaces; landscaping throughout the transit center; and improved streetscape. The project also includes 202 rental apartments, 10% of which will be affordable to low and moderate-income households. The construction of Phase I is underway. While not a City project, this transit oriented development will have a positive impact on the environment in San Carlos.
  • In October 2016, Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE) began to offer residents and businesses throughout San Mateo County clean, renewable energy from resources like solar and wind. The San Carlos City Council elected to opt-up and use the ECO100 energy at all municipal buildings. The City will continue to support PCE and assist with outreach to the community.

Survey – San Carlos

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San Mateo

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Transportation: The City of San Mateo is actively looking at ways to ease traffic and promote alternative transportation options. Short term we look at ways to ease traffic by promoting carpooling programs, promoting our City bike share and also hosting a website called Connect San Mateo that lets residents and commuters plan their trips and show different transportation options in the City.   The City is also promoting Evs. The San Mateo Sustainability Commission is looking at ways to promote and grow EV infrastructure at multi-family residences. The City is also hosting the 3rd EV Expo on 9/9/17.

Water conservation: Although last winter was very wet, San Mateo will still work as a leader in water conservation efforts by offering workshops on drought tolerant gardening, limiting its water usage in public parks and promoting programs like the Rain Barrel Rebate program.

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • The City launched a bike share pilot program in May 2016 with 50 bikes and 15 locations. The program will now add 50 more bikes by the end of 2017. All 100 bikes will be electric pedal assist, which should help grow the program to the more areas of the City.
  • In October 2016, The City of San Mateo partnered with Scoop, to provide discounted carpool rides in and out of the City. The program was successful and funding lasted almost 5 months. The program matched 2,400 participants with over 5,000 carpooler trips taken.
  • EV Infrastructure in multi-family dwellings – the San Mateo Sustainability Commission is looking at ways to promote and grow EV infrastructure at multi-family residences as a key initiative for 2016-17.
  • The City is now offering an additional $50 rebate on the purchase and installation of a rain barrel – this is in addition to the BAWSCA $50 rain barrel rebate, for a total rebate amount of $100.
  • LED streetlights – The City replaced just over 4,000 streetlight fixtures to LED bulbs.
  • The City adopted an ordinance that requires all new single-family homes to install a three-way diverter valve to allow for future laundry machine greywater reuse.
  • The City adopted an energy ordinance for mandatory solar systems on all new construction and cool roof installation for all new multi-family and commercial development.

The City adopted a green building ordinance that requires a higher number of mandatory electric vehicle ready (EV ready) parking spaces than what is required by the State for new construction projects.

Survey – San Mateo

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South San Francisco

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

  • Reduction of energy usage, VMTs, and GHGs
  • Reducing commute time & single occupancy vehicle use for residents and employees
  • Affordable housing (economic sustainability and livability)

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • The City is actively engaged in creating a high-density, transit oriented downtown with multi-family residential in close proximity to the Caltrain Station and the employment center east of 101. Additionally, the City is investing in a major upgrade to the Caltrain Station, in an effort to boost transit ridership and improve connectivity. These large-scale planning efforts are intended to reduce the need for single-occupancy vehicles, and create a more sustainable and livable community. SSF is also improving bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, and working on last-mile solutions for commuters and residents. We are also investing in additional EV parking at City facilities.

The City is also focusing on improvements to municipal facilities. The City is currently undergoing an energy efficiency evaluation and plan for City facilities, in an attempt to reduce energy and water usage. One successful project in significantly reducing GHGs is the installation of a high-efficiency turbo blower at the Water Quality Control Plan in 2016, which will save up to $100,000 per year, and will help the environment by eliminating approximately 1,054 metric tons of CO2 greenhouse gas emissions annually, or the equivalent of removing 70 passengers from the roadways.

Survey – South San Francisco

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Woodside

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

  • The Town has replaced lighting with LED lighting and using 50% less electricity at two locations.
  • The Town also has improved bike lanes on Whiskey Hill Road and on Alameda near Woodside High School.

Survey – Woodside

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 San Mateo County

Does your city have a minimum wage ordinance? Please describe the timeline, wage levels and other adjustments (such as requirements for use of prevailing wage labor in city-owned developments.)

The County of San Mateo has a living wage ordinance that was adopted by the Board of Supervisors in November of 2016. The City of San Mateo adopted a Minimum Wage Ordinance on August 15th, 2016. It requires annual increases in the Minimum Wage paid within the City boundaries, above and beyond the wage required by the State. The City Council adopted a wage schedule whereby most employers will be required to pay $15 per hour by 2019. Non-profit organizations that are tax-exempt per Section 501(c)(3) of the tax code are provided with an extended time frame to reach $15 per hour. Beginning January 1, 2020, and annually thereafter, the City will adjust the minimum wage based on the Regional Consumer Price Index.

What are the most pressing sustainability-related issues for your municipality in the short- and long-term?

Short TermHousingTransportationCost of living

Long Term: Sea Level Rise/ Adaptation, Water security, Housing equity, Quality of Life, Transportation, Health Care, Maintaining Government Essential Services

Please describe any other initiatives that showcase progress your municipality is making towards sustainability

Home for All, CAP program, Sea Level Rise Adaption

Survey – San Mateo County

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From the 2017 Indicators Report

Between 1989 and 2014, low income wages decreased by 7% and high income wages increased by 27% in San Mateo County.

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